In this page you can find news and feeds on family law subjects

  • Judiciary Open During Government Shutdown
    Despite a government shutdown, the federal Judiciary will remain open and can continue operations for approximately three weeks, through February 9, by using court fee balances and other funds not dependent on a new appropriation.
  • Courts Help Each Other Survive Hurricane Season
    Federal courts share their stories of surviving an extreme hurricane season.
  • Court Declares a Settlement Week to Clear Old Caseload
    The Western District Court of New York is one of the most congested courts in the country, receiving over 3,000 filings annually with individual judges’ caseloads at nearly 800. To reduce a long backlog of unresolved lawsuits, Chief Judge Frank P. Geraci, Jr., revived a mediation strategy not used by the court since 1995: a settlement week.
  • Federal Judiciary Workplace Conduct Working Group Formed
    James C. Duff, Director of the Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts, has established a Federal Judiciary Workplace Conduct Working Group to review the safeguards currently in place within the Judiciary to protect employees from inappropriate conduct in the workplace.   
  • Providing Equal Justice Through Training
    Lawyers reflect on how the Judiciary’s defender training program gives them the confidence and know-how to provide indigent clients with a solid defense. 
  • Chief Justice Roberts Issues 2017 Year-End Report
    Chief Justice John G. Roberts, Jr., has issued his 2017 Year-End Report on the Federal Judiciary.
  • Federal Judicial Center Marks 50th Anniversary
    The Federal Judicial Center, which has educated generations of federal judges and provided ground-breaking research on such topics as court technology and less costly ways to resolve disputes, celebrates its 50th anniversary on Dec. 20, 2017.
  • New Bankruptcy Form, Rules Take Effect
    Individuals filing for bankruptcy under Chapter 13 must use a new form that presents their payment plan in a more uniform and transparent manner, and creditors will have less time to submit a proof of claim, under new bankruptcy rules and form amendments that took effect Dec. 1.
  • Jury Scams Target Even Unlikely Victims
    Louisiana native Beth Cenac never thought she would be the target of a jury scam. She is a professional with a master’s degree who worked as a public librarian for 30 years and previously served on a jury.
  • Moments in History: Judge Jack Weinstein and Mass Tort Litigation
    Prominent judges, lawyers, and other associates share their recollections of the legal mastermind behind the Agent Orange class action settlement — U.S. Senior Judge Jack B. Weinstein, of the Eastern District of New York.
  • When Can Negligence Become Criminal?
    Normally, when we think of negligence, we think of traffic accidents and personal injury cases. Legally speaking, negligence is when carelessness results in an injury to a person or property. Such cases are normally dealt with by civil lawsuits for monetary damages to compensate the injured party, although sometimes......
  • Top 3 Legal Questions When Buying a Car
    Outside of buying a house, or a boat, or a houseboat perhaps, buying a car is one of the biggest financial investments we'll make. So it goes without saying that you should take the car buying process seriously and therefore you'll probably have a lot of questions you'll want......
  • 5 Banks Fined by Federal Reserve for Mortgage Servicing Flaws
    After the housing bubble burst way back in 2008, big banks had quite a few foreclosures on their hands. Only they didn't do a great job of managing those foreclosures. In 2011, the Federal Reserve found banks like Ally Financial, Bank of America, Goldman Sachs, JPMorgan Chase, Morgan Stanley,......
  • High Schoolers Banned From Basketball League for Racist Jerseys
    We all want sports to be fun, especially at the youth recreational level. "That's the thing," Ohio parent Tony Rue told WLWT, "those names are not having fun. It's not so much even if we had black students or African-American students, or any minority students. Our kids were offended."......
  • 3 Recent Developments in Animal Liability Law
    Sadly, animal attacks and bites occur all too frequently. Sometimes it's a sneaky raccoon slipping in the pet door, sometimes we're bitten by snakes trying to protect our pets, and other times we're bitten by snakes that are our pets. And then there are the times when our pets......
  • Florida ICP Fan Slips in Faygo, Falls off Stage, Sues
    It's hard out here for a Juggalo. Just ask Sarah Hastings, devoted Insane Clown Posse fan who took to the stage at a concert in St. Petersburg, then took a dive after slipping in the band's boisson de guerre, Faygo soda. While Faygo showers are a normal element of ICP's......
  • Can I Sue the Court?
    There are some classic threats you hear regarding legal arguments. "You're getting sued!" "I'll see you in court!" "I'm taking my case all the way to the Supreme Court!" But what if your beef is with a judge or the court itself? Can you take the court to court?......
  • New Laws Small Business Owners Should Know in 2018
    Last year was a busy time for small business owners. Between federal action on tax and immigration to state action on minimum wage and family leave, it might've seemed like you spent more time trying to keep pace with legal updates than running your small biz. Well, here's the......
  • Is Doxing Illegal?
    Depending on your point of view, releasing a person's identifying information on the internet might be one of the few ways to hold someone accountable for hateful actions or an avenue to unleashing hate upon an undeserving someone else. Trying to out white supremacists who participated in political violence?......
  • Starbucks Wins 'Underfilled' Lattes Lawsuit
    Starbucks customers are pretty fussy when it comes to their daily fix. That much was evidenced by fans of their lattes filing a class action lawsuit claiming the coffee chain was shorting them on their steamed milk. "Starbucks lattes are uniformly underfilled pursuant to a standardized recipe," the suit......
  • Can I Get Fired for Not Taking a Lunch Break at Work?
    Most of us work hard at our jobs, trying to get things done and make a positive impression on our bosses and colleagues. Many of us even work right through meals, skipping lunch to be more productive. Part of that motivation comes from knowing that we could be fired......
  • Manhattan Misdemeanor Charges No Longer Require Bail
    The money bail system, under which a criminal defendant may be required to post a cash bond to secure his or her release from jail before trial, has come under increasing scrutiny in the past few years. Critics claim that jurisdictions were using automatic bail requirements to raise municipal......
  • Top 3 Legal Issues for Trump's 'Fire and Fury' Defamation Claim
    As you may have heard by now, journalist Michael Wolf's "Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House" has caused quite a stir. The president was not too pleased with the work, and lawyers for Trump and the book's publisher traded some entertaining letters over it. (And, of course,......
  • NC Congressional Map Unconstitutionally Gerrymandered, Circuit Rules
    Last month, researchers from the Electoral Integrity Project scored North Carolina's overall electoral integrity at 58/100, placing it alongside the likes of Cuba, Indonesia, and Sierra Leone in terms of fostering free and fair and democratic elections. Not exactly the best of company. So bad, in fact, that those......
  • Civil Rights at Work: Respecting and Protecting Your Employees' Free Speech
    We live in politically-charged times, and we often don't check our opinions at the office door. And even if we do, the internet has an amazing knack for carrying them into work anyway. From loose water cooler talk to social media posts that go viral, employees can often put their......
  • What Is Prior Restraint?
    If Michael Wolff'sTrump tell-all book, Fire and Fury, reminds you of Shakespeare, it's probably the bard's take on life from Macbeth: "it is a tale / Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, / Signifying nothing." The same might be true of the bluster around the book,......
  • E. Coli and Wrongful Death Lawsuits
    Researchers at Consumer Reports think they've discovered the source of a deadly E. coli outbreak in the U.S. and Canada last week: romaine lettuce. The outbreak began in November 2017 and has sickened dozens, hospitalized five, and killed at least two people. While the U.S. Center for Disease Control......
  • Employer's Duty to Protect Workers From Dangerously Cold Conditions
    While some of us would love to close up shop in the midst of a "bomb cyclone," we may not have that luxury, putting employers in the unenviable position of asking employees to work in some frigid conditions. From postmen to presidents, most of us still have to go......
  • What's the Legal Limit for Driving While High?
    With few exceptions, every state set the blood-alcohol bar for drunk driving at .08 percent. And most state alcohol consumption laws are similar, as well. But states are, pardon the pun, all over the map when it comes to marijuana enforcement, ranging from therapeutic CBD oil use only in......
  • Transgender People Now Allowed to Enlist in U.S. Military
    Over the past six months, the U.S government has been split on transgender military service, with the president tweeting a ban, transgender service members suing over the tweets, the Secretary of Defense defying the president's order, and ultimately a federal court blocking the order. All that political and legal......

 

Advertisements